About

History

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) was founded on March 12, 1912 by Juliette Gordon Low in Savannah, Georgia. Gordon Low’s goal was for all girls to be able to serve their communities, build new skills, and help others. Over 100 years later, more than 59 million women across the U.S. are Girl Scout alumnae.

Girl Scouts of the Northwestern Great Lakes (GSNWGL) formed in 2008, the result of a nationwide organizational realignment. Formerly six separate Councils now comprise GSNWGL, which partners with 6,000 volunteers, serves approximately 17,000 girls, and covers 58 counties across northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Mission

Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

Council Vision

We are a viable, visible, girl-centered organization responsive and appealing to our members, volunteers, and staff. We engage quality individuals to help us deliver relevant programs that offer a lasting, positive impact.

Girl Scout Promise and Law

Girl Scout Promise

On my honor, I will try:
To serve God and my country,
To help people at all times,
And to live by the Girl Scout Law.

Girl Scout Law

I will do my best to be
honest and fair,
friendly and helpful,
considerate and caring,
courageous and strong, and
responsible for what I say and do,
and to
respect myself and others,
respect authority,
use resources wisely,
make the world a better place, and
be a sister to every Girl Scout.

Diversity & Inclusion

GSNWGL and GSUSA have a policy of inclusion and anti-bullying, which promotes diversity in all its categories. Diversity has been a core value of the organization since its founding in 1912. GSUSA and GSNWGL provide settings that enable us to serve girls in an emotionally and physically safe environment, allowing them to learn leadership skills and develop the confidence and character to serve as examples to their community.

We are an organization that promotes tolerance and respect with and for our members and volunteers regardless of their race, religion, age, culture, sexual orientation, identity, or socioeconomic background.